The Karlin Law Firm LLP

Providing quality legal services to statewide and national clients in ADA defense, Personal Injury, business and real estate for more than 35 years

Providing quality legal services to statewide and national clients in ADA defense, Personal Injury, business and real estate for more than 35 years

408-944-5626

Email Us

What does your small business have to do to comply with the ADA?

California small business owners have a lot to think about. From paying bills to managing employees, you may know first-hand how complex it can be to run a successful company. In addition to all of your other responsibilities and things you have to think about, you also have to be certain your business adheres to certain laws and regulations. 

One thing all businesses should consider is compliance with the ADA, which is the Americans with Disabilities Act. The laws under the ADA ensure that people with limited physical capabilities and mobility issues can shop, live and work like everyone else. It is your responsibility to comply with measures to ensure your customers and employees are safe and accommodated.

Specifics for your company 

You may not know where to even begin to learn more about ADA compliance and how it impacts your small business. From your website to your front steps, you would be prudent to take quick action to learn about these things, as failing to do so can expose you to the risk of lawsuits and other complications. Some steps you may find helpful include the following: 

  • Stick to the official process as much as possible. If you have an employee with a disability, you must accommodate him or her, but only up to a reasonable extent. Know your requirements and do not deviate from the official standards.
  • When dealing with matters pertaining to disabled customers or employees, it is smart to document everything. From conversations to installation of handicap-friendly safety measures, having a paper trail can protect you in case of a dispute in the future.
  • It is smart not to make any assumptions about disabilities and treat people as individuals. If someone needs help or accommodations, do not assume you know what that means. You can avoid many problems by remaining open to conversations and learning.

ADA compliance is something that you should not overlook, but you do not have to traverse the often murky waters of adherence and accommodations alone.

Small business owners often find it beneficial to discuss these issues with an experienced attorney who understands the law and knows how to protect the interests of all types of companies. Your business’ interests are at stake, and it is smart to know what is expected of you so you can save time and money, and avoid the potential for legal trouble down the road.

FindLaw Network